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HomeUncategorizedUS Government Agency Admits to Accidentally Starting Massive Wildfire That Destroyed Hundreds...

US Government Agency Admits to Accidentally Starting Massive Wildfire That Destroyed Hundreds of Homes

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The fire destroyed almost 1,300 square kilometers of forest and caused the displacement of thousands of residents.

US Forest Service .(USFS, for its acronym in English), acknowledged accidentally starting two fires that merged last month to become the largest wildfire on record in the state of New Mexico, destroying hundreds of homes.

“Forest Service fire investigators determined that the Calf Canyon Fire, in the Pecos/Las Vegas Ranger District of the Santa Fe National Forest (SFNF), was caused by a remnant of a stack burn from January, which lay dormant under the surface for three winter snowfalls before resurfacing in April,” the entity reported this Friday in a statement.

According to the agency, the fire, which had supposedly been completely extinguished in January, it was revived and “escaped the containment lines“, merging with the hermi’s fire ts Peak, which was caused by a scheduled burn that got out of control on April 6.

The merger of the two fires destroyed almost 1,300 square kilometers of high-altitude forests and valleys in the Sangre de Cristo mountain range, while destroyed at least 330 homes, causing the displacement of thousands of residents. In addition, it caused environmental damage, destroying wildlife habitat and making the region more prone to landslides.

The effects of the flames continue building up, as the fire continues. It was 48% contained as of Saturday morning, despite the efforts of nearly 3,000 people who work in the area. The costs to try to extinguish the fire amounted to 132 million dollars, and increase to a rate of 5 million per day, indicated the governor of New Mexico, Michelle Lujan Grisham.

In addition, Lujan asked the federal government to pay for all the damage caused for the fire, adding that federal forest managers need to reexamine their practices and “make sure they take into account a rapidly changing climate.”

For its part, the USFS last week suspended the use of scheduled burns for 90 days while the agency conducts a review of its practices.

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